Aetna mails it in

Sometimes an envelope and poorly thought out patient privacy procedures are all you need for a data breach, as Aetna discovered last summer. The insurance company was, no joke, sending out letters in response to a previous privacy violation, notifying patients who took the HIV preventative PrEP about changes to ordering the medication. So they put this information in an envelope with a nice, oversized window where you can see the patient’s name and a reference to HIV prescriptions. That’s a patient privacy nightmare for any condition, and it’s made worse due to the stigma still surrounding the virus.  Aetna agreed to pay $17M to the patients last Wednesday, which will presumably come in the form of checks with the memo “We’re sorry about telling everyone about your HIV status.”

These aren’t the RFPs you’re looking for

Oklahoma recently became the fourth US state to file a lawsuit against opioid manufacturers, and they won’t be the last. States like Delaware have even begun asking for RFPs from private law firms. The uptick in lawsuits against opioid producers has many drawing comparisons to lawsuits against Big Tobacco in the 90s. Those ended up costing the involved companies over $200 billion. If there’s something similar coming down the road for “Big Pharma” (which is not only a conspiracy theory, but also apparently a game?) then it won’t be a mere drop in the bucket. The entire pharma industry made $778 billion in prescription sales last year, so a similar fine against a small group of companies could leave them hurting.

Oral anticoagulants…who needs ‘em?

Patients with atrial fibrillation do! According to a new study, hundreds of thousands of patients aren’t receiving them each year. Folks with AFib are at a very high risk for stroke, and guess what? Oral anticoagulants—a.k.a. blood thinners—can reduce the risk by two-thirds and direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are proven to be just as effective, if not more so. No, this isn’t a groundbreaking new therapy. Quite the opposite. DOACs have been available since 2010. 655,000 patients were evaluated in the study and the data show that over a seven-year period, only 6 out of 10 patients with high stroke risk were prescribed these potentially life-saving meds. This guy sums it up best.