Safe T first

Yay, we get to write another article about fewer needles in the lives of diabetics! Researchers in London are working on an immunotherapy approach to slow down the progression of Type I Diabetes, which would ideally result in a future where those diabetics won’t have to inject insulin daily. The disease works by attacking insulin-producing cells, so the scientists decided to try to get the lazy part of the immune system that wasn’t stopping that—regulatory T cells—to stop playing video games and get a job! (Sorry. Too close to home?) The scientists proved the safety of this approach in a recent Phase I study, so it will be a while before anything is marketed to the general public, but we just think this immunotherapy stuff is the bee’s knees.

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Alexa, manage my disease

Amazon Echo users can use voice commands to do all sorts of things. “Alexa, order granola bars.” “Alexa, turn on the lights.” “Alexa, clean the house.” (Just kidding…hey, one can dream, right?) Now Merck & Co. is sponsoring the Alexa Diabetes Challenge in which contestants submitted concepts for using Alexa’s technology for diabetes management. The ideas from the five finalists span from a smart foot scanner, to a coach that responds to patients’ moods, to a nutrition assistant that utilizes machine learning to provide meal recommendations. The winner gets $125k and a whole lot of bragging rights.

This makes InsightCity want jump on the contest bandwagon. Email us (info@insightcity.com) a funny testimonial about why you love (or hate?) our newsletter—130 words or less, just like our writers have to do. The knee-slappingest, ROFLMAO-iest testimonial will win a $50 prepaid gift card. And we’ll send your write-up out in one of our newsletters—without your name, of course. You’ll be kinda famous, but in an anonymous sort of way. May the odds be ever in your favor. We’ll let this contest run for two weeks. Go!

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The diabetes monster’s gonna get you (it’s a real thing)

This week Roche announced it was purchasing mySugr, an Austrian digital health company. The mySugr app is reportedly being used by more than 1M people to manage their diabetes. The app blends the tracking of blood sugar (e.g. the Diabetes Monster) with educational materials and even offers access to live coaching from trained Certified Diabetes Educators. Roche and mySugr have been partners since 2014 and have integrated Roche’s Bluetooth-enabled Accu-Chek (they obviously can’t spel) Connect meter to the other devices mySugr’s app uses to sync user data. Looking deeper, Roche was also an investor in mySugr. See, there is money to be made in the app world and this is another reminder that large pharma continues to invest in digital patient-centric approaches to therapy development.

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Got diabetes? Do sweat it.

University of Texas at Dallas researchers have developed a new wearable for type 2 Diabetes management, which promises tons more data in exchange for a lot less blood. Instead, their device asks for just 1-3 microliters of sweat, which is probably less than the amount formed on my keyboard in the process of writing this article. The biosensor uses a “room temperature ionic liquid” to stabilize the skin’s environment, ensuring reliable readings of glucose, cortisol, and interleukin-6 compounds for up to a week. So instead of jabbing themselves hundreds of times in a month with single use test strips, diabetics could just buy 4 biosensors and be all set, while having the luxury of pulling up their levels on the device’s app at any time.

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Twitter police called in to the America Diabetes Association conference

You will respect my authority (warning: South Park clip). In one of the stranger moves of 2017, the American Diabetes Association tried really really, hard (think someone looking over your shoulder) to lockdown photo sharing via social media at their annual conference. Twits were greeted with “Thanks for joining us at #2017ADA! Photography isn’t allowed during presentations — we’d appreciate it if you’d delete this tweet.” Charming. And it gets better. The rebukes even came when people shared photos during an open innovation session. @MatthewJDalby said it best, “The first rule of open innovation: You don’t talk about open innovation.” We are a little jealous we didn’t come up with that one. We think the burden of privacy in today’s world sits with the presenter, not the audience. Agreed?

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The dia-tarian diet

Two options: honey lemon chicken or marinated tofu. I know, I know that’s not a tough choice and face it, even vegans would choose the chicken if they could. But for the 150 million+ diabetics worldwide, tofu and cooked millet may become your new favorite meal. OK, so the favorite part may be an exaggeration, but hey, if a vegetarian diet can increase weight loss and improve your metabolism then it’s worth a shot, or a taste. Yep, according a new study this veggie diet beat out the conventional diabetic diet on both counts, just not the taste category. Of course with diabetes prevalence expected to double by 2025 and with one-third of the world now considered overweight, we may want to consider rewiring our taste buds.

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A big, fat mistake?

When dietary guidelines were issued by the US and UK governments in 1977 and 1983, they were badly supported by evidence, so says a recent publication in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Guidelines called for total fat and saturated fat to contribute no more than 30% and 10%, respectively, to a person’s total energy intake. According to study authors, while authorities acknowledged at the time that the link between fat consumption and heart problems was unsupported, guidelines were released on the grounds that “it couldn’t hurt.” Study authors draw parallels between the introduction of the fat guidelines and the beginning of the rise in rates of obesity and diabetes. They posit that lowering fat consumption may have been instrumental in the skyrocketing incidence and prevalence rates for diabesity.

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