A bit obsessed with Fitbit

Last week, researchers found that exercise can counteract the cognitive decline some patients experience post-breast cancer treatment. It’s the 457th publication since 2012 to use a Fitbit device in research. Or to put it a different way, this study found that 83 percent of clinical trials used a Fitbit as opposed to another brand. Researchers apparently just really prefer it. That’s good news for the company, since it now has a slew of clinical data under its belt, and it’s thinking about a run at a medical device designation a few years in the future. According to their GM of Health Solutions, “as we start going deeper down the health road with more and more advanced sensors, I’d say, just stay tuned.” Oooooh, mysterious.

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Clinical trial participation – from the comfort of home

In the age of Amazon Prime, grocery delivery, and, yep, even sock delivery subscriptions, it’s getting easier and easier to never leave the house. And it’s even more annoying when you do have to venture out and interact with other human beings, amirite? Luckily for us hermits, PAREXEL and Sanofi aim to make it easier to participate in clinical trials from the comfort of your Lazy Boy. The two companies are launching a pilot study to test the medical and scientific viability of wearable devices in clinical trials using PAREXEL’s patient sensor solution. The goals are to make things easier on patients and sites, collect a whole bunch of data, and reduce costs all the way around. High five for progress!

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2. Ex-FDA head has (legitimate?) concerns

Fresh off the clock, ex-FDA commish Robert Califf recently vented a few concerns he has with speeding up drug approvals. #1: Faster approval does nothing to address popular concern for the cost of drugs. Pharma will still say they must recoup hefty development costs and people will still not trust that explanation. #2: Are speed and safety at odds? As Califf puts it, “Declaring a drug safe after very little information is treacherous.” All drugs have risk and this risk is only uncovered through evidence. Check out 22 case studies where the bottom fell out between Phase II and III. And #3: Drugs can’t be approved faster if the FDA needs more FDA-ites – employees. We’re not sure what they call themselves.

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3. Vaccine to multiple strains of malaria: “Fight me, bro”

A promising vaccine under development by Sanaria has some malaria strains running scared. The PfSPZ vaccine was shown to not only protect 64% of subjects from contracting the strain of malaria the treatment was developed from, the vaccine also protected 5 of the 6 subjects treated and exposed to a different strain. Sorry subject #6! Oh, and it does all this while affording eight months of protection at >90% efficacy, which no malaria vaccine to date has been able to do. It’s currently in Phase I, though it has been given fast track designation, so if it can survive the arduous clinical trials process it could be a very important tool in the fight to eradicate malaria.

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