Hep C, all the cool kids are treating it

Gilead isn’t the only Hep C game in town but, to date, has held strong to its first-mover advantage. According to a recent article in Investor’s Business Daily, that may soon change. And not because of a lower price. AbbVie’s competitive offering will still list for around $28,000 per month. Its competitive advantage lies in its 4-week shorter treatment regimen. Also, AbbVie’s glecaprevir and pibrentasvir drug combo is likely to be approved with few conditions. Where Gilead’s treatment combo is a 12-week regimen for patients who have not previously responded to a single drug treatment, AbbVie’s combo is taken for only 8 weeks and will probably be approved as a first-line treatment. “Aw, crap,” thought someone at Gilead, probably.

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4. And this is why you go to school

AbbVie is now in a 5-year relationship with Johns Hopkins and Northwestern University. The goal?  Advancing oncology R&D. The pharmaceutical giant will work with each university independently, providing funding for preclinical research and access to AbbVie’s existing research. Of course, in the spirit of reciprocation, AbbVie can exclusively claim any new discoveries as its own. Therapeutic areas of research will include breast, lung, prostate, and colorectal cancers, among others. This is not the first time AbbVie has tapped the power of academic institutions. They entered a multi-million dollar oncology research collaboration with University of Chicago last April.  Arrangements like these have the potential to be a win-win-win for pharma, academia and patients alike. After all, sharing is caring.

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A HealthyDose™ of Biosimilars

Did you know that 9 of the top 10 best-selling US biologics will have fallen out of patent protection by 2020? No?

Maybe you should talk to your doctor to see if a HealthyDose™ of biosimilars is right for you. Side effects include: euphoria caused by an acute awareness of feeling yourself getting smarter, accusations of being a know-it-all by your colleagues, and more euphoria due to objectively knowing you are in fact smarter than your colleagues.

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5. Keep your enemies closer

Teva wants in the club. PhRMA, to be exact. Some existing members of PhRMA want the world’s largest generics company to take a long walk off a short pier. Probably something to do with the long, ugly history of patent challenges. AbbVie EVP, Carlos Alban, for one, wrote Teva’s membership would dilute PhRMA’s emphasis on innovation. Teva touts its more than $6 Billion in branded revenue as evidence to the contrary. And here’s another problem for those throwing shade on Teva’s application… PhRMA’s membership already includes companies with substantial interests in generic products (see Novartis / Sandoz, Pfizer / Hospira, and others). We think PhRMA will have a difficult time denying Teva’s application. But we also think the welcome dinner may be poorly attended.

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