Laurel vs. Yanny, explained

In case you haven’t heard, there’s a massive global debate prompted by a simple one-word audio recording that different individuals perceive to say different things. Apparently, Twitter data finds that 53% hear the word “Laurel” and 43% hear “Yanny.” It provides an interesting lesson in audiology and perception. According to people smarter than this writer, the reason people perceive the recording differently comes down to the fact that we live in different bodies. Differences at any point along the path from the outer ear to the brain can lead to changes in perception. Differences might include the size of your ear hole (that sounds dirty, amirite?), to the positioning of your ossicles (middle ear bones), the condition of your ear drum, and even the thickness of your skull. Wuuuut? In the case of Laurel vs. Yanny, the theory is all these lead to a person being more inclined to perceive either the lower register of sounds (Laurel) or higher register (Yanny). For the record, the correct answer is Laurel. Trust me.

Just the essentials

The World Health Organization’s Essential Medicines List has been around for decades and provides the rest of the world’s health organizations a basis for creating their own cost-effective formularies. Well what use is a list of essential medicines if we don’t know who to treat with them? To that end, the WHO has released the Essential Diagnostics List. It’s designed to diagnose the world’s most common diseases, as well as “priority diseases,” like HIV and malaria. The list currently includes 113 tests, but expect that to grow in the next few years as the WHO gets more feedback. Speaking of essential lists, here’s 33 Essential Life Hacks. Disclaimer: Buzzfeed and the WHO probably have a wildly diverging understanding of what “essential” means.

CDMO industry sees mo’ mo’ expansion

It’s a decent time to be a Contract Development & Manufacturing Organization (CDMO). Google “CDMO expansion” and you’ll spend hours sifting through recent and relevant articles about how CDMOs are expanding, merging, and/or acquiring assets. Recently, one of the industry’s largest CDMOs (WuXi AppTec) raised more than $353m in its initial public offering on China’s Shanghai exchange. Here are two good sources for recent activity in the CDMO space: 2017 DCAT summary and one from 2018. For a more graphical summary of CDMO activities, see this infographic. And if that’s not enough, here’s one example of a recent 1,000-person expansion from Lonza at their New Hampshire site. Given all the activity in the industry, we don’t see a way around the fact that soon CDMOs will have Mo’ Money, Mo’ Money.

There’s an app for that

Novartis recently launched an app that enables patients taking part in ophthalmic clinical trials to self-report data, which could potentially speed the development of new therapies. Here’s lookin’ at you kid. According to a wonderful report from Deloitte, “the number of apps produced by pharma more than tripled from 2013 to 2016, but the year-over-year growth rate of downloads slowed from 197% between 2013 and 2014 to just 5% between 2015 and 2016.” Maybe pharma lies outside the circle of trust? The Deloitte report also states, “pharma apps are trusted by 32% of consumers, compared to 76% for apps developed by patient communities.” Look for more pharma-association collaborations like the Quitter’s Circle from Pfizer and the American Lung Association. Is it better that the Novartis app is for clinical trials? Hear InsightCity’s take on this article with this short podcast. (It’s our first one. We’re not pros. Don’t be mean.)

Summary of Trump’s Drug Pricing Plan

American Patients First. Catchy title. Unless you’ve been under a rock, you’ve likely heard of President Trump’s “sweeping” drug pricing proposals. While it’s way too complicated a topic to cover in our typical article length, we’re going to provide some of the better summaries. First is a nice summary about how this could impact the drug distribution system. Second is about how PhRMA increased its lobbying by 30% in 2017. Third is how Wall St. reacted in a positive manner on Friday, signaling Wall St. isn’t scared of the Trump plan for drug makers. Our last point is how Health & Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar said pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) are a prime target in the effort. There will be lots more to digest in the future as the plan is unraveled. As the Brits say, keep calm and carry on.