UK to nurses: where’d EU go?

Britain’s NHS has been struggling to keep up with nurse staffing, just like the US, Japan, and seemingly most of the world. The UK health system is projected to have a shortage of 30,000 nurses in the next year, and Brexit isn’t helping that number any. About 1,300 EU nurses applied to work in the country the month after Brexit. That same figure in April? Just 46. That’s about a 96% drop. This InsightCity writer has seen drag shows with less dramatic drops. To be sure, this is a chronic shortage and the Brexit vote is definitely not the primary cause of it. But it’s something to keep in mind as the UK prepares to begin goodbye negotiations with the EU.

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3. No GSK exit after Brexit

Brexit, “bad news” for UK based Pharmaceutical companies, right? Well, if you consider a £275m (~$360m USD) investment by GlaxoSmithKline bad news, then sure. Sir Andrew Witty, CEO of GSK and proponent of the “remain” vote in June’s EU referendum, said that the company will be expanding each of its manufacturing plants located in County Durham, Angus, and Hertfordshire. The investment is expected to create jobs at these expanded sites, and it can be largely credited to the UK’s competitive tax system. Witty, who said leaving the EU would be a mistake explained that the “underlying attractiveness in terms of the UK’s economic strengths and its fiscal environment haven’t changed and that’s why we feel very strongly that this investment makes sense.”

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4. Britain, Brexit, and the pharma fallout

If demographic stereotypes hold, drug company employees in the UK probably voted to remain in the EU. Makes sense. Conventional wisdom holds that remaining would have been better for business. Now that the vote has gone the other way, a task force of drug company CEOs and government officials has been put together to combat problems such as uncertainty, added complexity and potential drug approval delays. Several large-scale concerns are on the table.  Will British patients have to go to the back of the line, behind the EU, for new medicines? Will Britain need to recreate its own regulatory body for the approval and regulation of medicines? Only (a long) time will tell.

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